A look back to Clarkston’s roots from 2015

Some records show that the first pioneer of the Clarkston was Linus Jacox who squatted on the land and built a log cabin, he was just a simple farmer who planted potatoes, it wasn’t until 1831 when Butler Holcomb of New York bought 640 acres, including Jacox’s , from the government in order to develop and build homes that the area began to grow. Now that Holcomb had the ball rolling the area was ready to be developed and that’s exactly what Jermiah Clark did  in 1832  when he built his home on what is now Clarkston’s main street which still stands today with the address of 71 N. Main. The Clarks were very important in building this town from the ground up, they started numerous businesses such as a sawmill, gristmill,  fishery, general store and even helped with mail delivery. Additionally Jermiah served as supervisor for the young township as well as justice of the peace and in 1842 the people recognizing the enormous contributions he had made decided to name the town after him. Major Oliver Williams also played an important part in helping Clarkston grow, initially most believed that the area was quite in-hospitable and it wasn’t until Major Oliver Williams bought a piece of land as well as giving the area a glowing report that people began to flock there. By 1877 Clarkston’s population was nearly 1,500  and home to many growing farms and businesses. Schools such as Sashabaw was built in 1834 and the high school became public in 1862 after originally being the Union School built by Jermiah’s brother Nelson. The first church was Clarkston was controlled by Methodist missionaries who built the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1847 and shortly after the first Baptist church was erected on main street and is know a nationally known restaurant. Today Clarkston is still very proud of its history as it has continued and developed over the years, one can view and learn alot of Clarkston’s history at the Independence Township Library which has a museum dedicated to the town which continually and proudly changes displays. http://www.clarkstonhistorical.org/?page_id=35

Orginally published by http://www.clarkstonhistorical.org/
Orginally published by http://www.clarkstonhistorical.org/